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rivet tool or rivnut tool
October 26, 2013
7:10 pm
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joe9zero
Cranwell
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Guys,
I need a sensible piece of advice please. I have a rivet tool (like a pair of pliers operated in reverse) but do I need a rivnut tool too or are they one and the same thing? I'm right at the start of my build and before I start drilling holes in the frame, II'd like to know if I already have a suitable piece of equipment. :-)
Thanks in advance
Joe

Just remember, speed limits are there for your protection and they are limits NOT targets (My Arse!)

October 26, 2013
9:05 pm
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grimbo
Wing Buckinghamshire
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They are different tools the rivnut tool fits a threaded insert into the frame
have a look at this link (if it works)
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like.....038;ff19=0

Laugh

October 26, 2013
9:09 pm
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joe9zero
Cranwell
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Thanks Grimbo :-) . They looked very similar so I wondered if I could just change the mandrels but obviously not :-\

Just remember, speed limits are there for your protection and they are limits NOT targets (My Arse!)

October 27, 2013
8:26 am
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MidsZero
Melton Mowbray
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Morning Joe,

Yes they are similair but different, I got a cheapish one on Ebay, worked a treat!

So the build begins, good luck and enjoy

John

GBS Zero, 2.0 Zetec, Plenum chamber, Emerald ECU. Est 170BHP Kawasaki Green

October 27, 2013
2:58 pm
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Bill Rees
Mansfield
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Hi there, Having just finished my Zero I would have to recommend to buy the best you can afford with rivnut setting tools, I went through 3 tools while building mine, Having said that, 2 where the same, I sent the 1st one back under warranty, but then after a dozen or so rivnuts managed to brake that one as well. Finally got one which attaches to a cordless drill, wish I'd gone down that route when I started, a lot less effort. Got my last one from Tool Academy... link below.

http://www.thetoolacademy.com/.....uctId=4916

October 27, 2013
6:28 pm
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joe9zero
Cranwell
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Thanks John and thanks Bill :-)

One question Bill, when you were using the drill powered rivnut tool, how was it for clearances? I mean did you have any problems getting the drill into some of the tighter spots?

Just remember, speed limits are there for your protection and they are limits NOT targets (My Arse!)

October 29, 2013
7:37 am
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Bill Rees
Mansfield
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joe9zero said

Thanks John and thanks Bill :-)

One question Bill, when you were using the drill powered rivnut tool, how was it for clearances? I mean did you have any problems getting the drill into some of the tighter spots?

Hi Joe,
Clearance wasn't a problem, but it does depend on your individual drill ? I did use a right angle cordless drill for the underside of the nose cone, having said that I should have set the rivnuts while it was still on the tressels, instead of jacking it up once I had it on the ground, and my jacks could have done with an extra 2 inch of travel on them so my normal drill would have fitted.

Bill.

December 15, 2013
6:30 pm
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Roy P
Coventry, West Midlands
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grimbo said

They are different tools the rivnut tool fits a threaded insert into the frame
have a look at this link (if it works)
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like.....038;ff19=0

Laugh

Bought one of these last week, excellent product at a good price, used it today

December 17, 2013
7:14 pm
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joe9zero
Cranwell
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Laugh Thanks everyone. I think I have all I need for now, time to get my ass down the motor club and get on it!

Just remember, speed limits are there for your protection and they are limits NOT targets (My Arse!)

October 13, 2015
9:37 pm
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Mitch
Gloucester
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Do I need to use rivnuts or can I just rivet things on? If I need one is this any good?

http://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/Silver.....0408.m2460

October 14, 2015
6:13 am
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eddog
nottingham
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September 29, 2015
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It's not cheap but I have just found this on eBay. Wondering if it would be suitable as it does rivets and rivnuts?

http://pages.ebay.com/link/?na.....38;alt=web

October 14, 2015
3:58 pm
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Simon
GBS Technical
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mitch said

Do I need to use rivnuts or can I just rivet things on? If I need one is this any good?

http://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/Silver.....0408.m2460

rivets should be considered a one fix solution, if you need to get anything apart again they are time consuming and you risk enlarging the hole they fit to a point where they don't. Rivets locate but will not take to much load, unless you go for the more costly type even then rivnuts are far more secure.

my advise would be separate tools for rivets and rivnuts rather than the combined tool, I understand they work, but swapping their function is a bit time consuming.

Also the rivnut type with the puller mandrel that screws into the tool is awkward to use as it has a tendency to unscrew if you find you need to pull the rivnut up in two operations. often the case unless you are built like Geff Capes.

October 14, 2015
6:48 pm
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Mitch
Gloucester
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Thanks as always Simon. Will invest in the rivnut tool

October 14, 2015
8:49 pm
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Marlin
Willits, California, USA
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A trick I've used with rivnuts is to place a small drop of red Loctite on the outside before squeezing in place. Bonds the metals and heat required to remove. Obviously make sure none gets on the inside threads.
Cheers, Marlin

Zero GT Mazda(1.8LVVT) ordered Nov 9 '15, arrived Apr 15 '16,

October 14, 2015
9:37 pm
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jeffives
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Do you use rivnuts at the same spacing as rivets? I'm going to make one side on my prop shaft tunnel and back panel removable and was going to use 6mm flat head stainless steel rivnuts with a 20cm to 30cm spacing. Just wondering what others have done.

Andrew.

Building a road legal Mazda race kit for a race season.

October 14, 2015
10:11 pm
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Simon
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tunnel sides and back panel (i assume you mean back of passenger compartment) are usually glued and riveted into position.

would ask why you are planning to make these panels removable?

you will loose the strength that the bonded panels afford the chassis, and are drilling quite large holes (7mm for a 5mm bolt and 9.5 for a 6) into a 25mm box section, rivets, are only used to position the panels in place to allow the glue to set, not fix the panel themselves, so a lot fewer than you would think, and only require a 3.2mm hole.

It can be tight working from the top of the tunnel but it is possible, especially as we would advise that everything is built before the tunnel sides as well as the vehicle sides are fitted after everything else is in position.

October 15, 2015
9:10 pm
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jeffives
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Hi Simon

I'm just playing with the idea of a removable rear panel but I was going to make the off side tunnel panel removable for easier access due to it being a Mazda race and to speed up possible repairs.

How much structural rigidity do you think would be lost in a removable tunnel side panel and would it outweigh the benefit of easer access.

Many thanks

Andrew

Building a road legal Mazda race kit for a race season.

October 15, 2015
9:37 pm
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Simon
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you mention a "race", that, unfortunately, can mean different things, as the "race" chassis can be standard to quite bespoke one offs.

On the full "race" the tank sits higher in the chassis, directly behind the passenger rear bulk head, and can only be fitted from the passenger compartment. We fit the bulk head as standard but with a cut out to allow tank replacement if necessary. the bulk head is then sealed with a removable panel, riv nuts are used for the panel.

On a more "road" layout the tank is in the standard position, I can not see you gaining anything making the bulkhead removable.

The side panel is debatable, the gearbox is removed forward, everything can be reached from the top or underside, the diff mounts are outside the tunnel, the only real gain is easier prop bolt removal, but that can still be done from above. the rest in the tunnel is not really serviceable, brake pipe, fuel pipes and loom. rear area is tight but again accessible from the top, possibly easier for handbrake and speed sensor, although the standard speed sensor mount bridges the tunnel using both sides for support, but that can be made UN-boltable to remove side.

I am told, I am not a structural engineer, that the bonded panels, in total, add approx 30% to the structures rigidity, what proportion a tunnel side or a rear bulk head would make, I do not know.

Apart from the consideration of above, there is no particular reason why you should not do what you suggest.

Just a thought, we do make the rear section of the car removable on the "race", makes repair easier after a foray off track, and that is bolted via rivnuts but with surprisingly few attachments. but they are usually special alloy panels, cut as stainless, the difference is the area around the crescents, the alloy being part of the rear panel, the stainless having separate crescent fill panels.

hope this makes sense.

October 16, 2015
9:40 pm
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jeffives
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Thank you Simon that clears a lot up and makes perfect sense.

Is there a guide you use / have to show the size, sort and where to use rivnuts for panels and parts?

Also is there any drawing you have of how the rear race panel go's together and how and where its attached to the chassis please..

For information my chassis is a standard GT body Mazda race, the only couple of unusual bits are it has the brackets for lights as I plain to make it road legal at some point and it will have a bigger tank to have enough juice for a 45min race.

Andrew

Building a road legal Mazda race kit for a race season.

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